The last number of years has seen an explosion in the popularity and adoption of the DevOps movement and its ways. I have had various dealings with 'things of a DevOps nature' through a number of different opportunities, channels and requests.

One thing which has always struck me is how challenging it can be, and still is, for organisations to adopt DevOps ways into their work practices. Some commentators I come across claim this is madness and DevOps just works for all organisations, large and small. it just makes sense, it delivers real value and … (so forth). 

I agree with all of the benefits of DevOps. I agree organisations need to look at DevOps and see where it will (not can) add value. I will not argue against that. However, I also see many organisations struggling to adopt DevOps and adapt current ways of working to fit the ways / principles / philosophies / cultural aspects of DevOps. In other cases I see DevOps in use – but in an isolated manner, not integrated into the end-to-end IT workings. So not true DevOps in-place. Perhaps more of a DevAgile-With-The-Same-Old-Ops kind of approach. 

Anyway – back to organisations struggling to adopt DevOps. Are these organisations becoming the CounterCULTURE of DevOps? Why not, what with the rise of DevOps and ongoing relegation of lower velocity IT organisations. 

Posting initial thoughts for now- I will come back to The CounterCULTURE of DevOps shortly.

Mark O'Loughlin

Mark is a global authority in helping organisations achieve the very best from their investments in people, technology and digital services. He has served on the Board of Directors of itSMF Ireland and Cloud Credential Council. Mark is a Fellow of the Irish Computer Society, awarded for his achievements and contribution to the IT profession and industry. His prolific publishing includes two books published in four languages, 100’s of articles, and whitepapers. He developed the world’s first certification for the business management of cloud services accredited by Cloud Credential Council. As a member of the international standards group ISO/IEC JTC 1/SC 38, Mark contributed to the development of global standards for IT, cloud and digital services.