Microsoft Corporation v. United States of America and a small island in Western Europe.

So, the result is in. At least until the next time perhaps. The legal challenges to Microsoft to allow a US judge gain access to a single email which is stored in a European data centre (Dublin) has come to a close (for now!!).

And the verdict. A US court has ruled that the US government cannot force Microsoft to give authorities access to the firm’s servers located in other countries.

So on one hand privacy (to a point, and as much as can be) seems protected, while others cite the fact that criminals can avail of such privacy to provide a ‘safe haven’ for certain activities.

-Judge Susan Carney ruled against the DoJ on the basis that the Stored Communications Act of 1986 limited the reach of warrants applicable outside the US. She noted that such restrictions were vital to maintaining good relations with other nations.

However…

-Another judge involved in the ruling, Gerard Lynch, said the 1986 law was in urgent need of an update.

“I concur in the result,” he wrote. “But without any illusion that the result should even be regarded as a rational policy outcome, let alone celebrated as a milestone in protecting privacy.”

While there is a firm judgement in place for now, the question remains what next, and when will countries look to update either their laws or collaborate on an international level?

In the meantime it looks like major and significant public cloud providers will continue to spring up datacentres in-country for key locations / customer bases to encourage adoption of their services without data and privacy issues such as this one.

Some references below.

Microsoft

https://blogs.microsoft.com/on-the-issues/2016/07/14/search-warrant-case-important-decision-people-everywhere/#sm.0000ohl1ni2fbdetvbb1ogcd3bro0

BBC

http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-36800334

This has been a very interesting case and one I personally discuss when teaching the Professional Cloud Service Manager course. We look at this from the perspectives of creating a cloud strategy and design considerations regarding privacy when using clouds. It is a very powerful case study for a number of reasons.

Cloud workload portability. Concerned or care?

In a recent article, InfoWorld looks at cloud workload portability and if it is a reality or not.

Portability is one of a number of specific design considerations one should examine closely before entering a public cloud and still relevant for private clouds. Portability, or the perceived lack of portability within clouds, is considered a barrier to adoption for some firms. Other firms may experience dissatisfaction with their cloud experience after a period of time when they may choose to move to another cloud provider. For others there may be no issue, for example test and development environments.

The article goes on to state that ‘Sure, Docker and container management and orchestration solutions have made portability vastly easier, but as soon as you start availing yourself of the special services of whatever platform you’re on, you’re hooked’.

The general premise of the article is sound. However, I think it misses a point, in that data portability in clouds, using technologies such as Docker, container management and orchestration solutions should provide less of a barrier for those firms concerned with portability, and more opportunity to those where portability is less of an issue.

Once you integrate any IT solution with other proprietary and, in many instances, non-propriety solutions and integrations, the ability of portability diminishes. This holds true for cloud and non-cloud (traditional IT) scenarios.

As we discovered on the Professional Cloud Service Manager course delivered last week, when the concept of cloud service arbitrage becomes a reality, hopefully full portability will be addressed, with the added bonus of true utility pricing capabilities for cloud users.

Until then, portability is one of the elements which should be considered when at the define stage of your cloud adoption strategy – even on a per-application, platform or instance basis, i.e. before a firm moves workloads into the cloud. It should also feature heavily in the design stage of a firms planned adoption of cloud based services.

Want to know more about how the Professional Cloud Service Manager course can help in your firm in their adoption of cloud computing and cloud based services? Get in touch or use link below.

The InfoWorld’s article can be found here.

Professional Cloud Service Manager Day 3- May 19th

Professional Cloud Service Manager Day 3- May 19th

Day three of the Professional Cloud Service Manager drew to a close some hours ago. The scenic backdrop of Glanmire in Cork was a perfect location to take three days out to deliver the course. We had an international affair with delegates from Ireland, Finland and Saudi Arabia.

Day three examined a number of ITIL process and the impact of cloud on these. We examined the role of governance and the gaps that exist today. Exam prep completed after lunch. It was a shame to say goodbye to all, but as the phrase goes ‘all good things must come to an end’.

Best of luck to all the delegates with the exam and results.

Professional Cloud Service Manager – May16th

I am in the idyllic surroundings of Glanmire in Cork Ireland getting ready for tomorrows delivery of the Professional Cloud Service Manager course. Throughout day one I strip away all the marketing and technological layers to ensure delegates get the real and simple understanding of what cloud computing is all about. We work through key aspects of cloud and take a time warp back to the 1950s.

After lunch there is one hour of hands on workbook assignments for the delegates, then we get to grips with ten critical roles in cloud computing and spend some time on exam prep and review a number of real world case studies.

The final assignment of the day is a sample exam paper which the delegates get to do for homework. Yes you work hard and fast on this course!!

By the end of the day the delegates will be able to describe what cloud computing is in three, yes three, simple words – and more, but this is an achievement in itself.

What to know more about cloud computing and PCSM? Click the link more details regarding the Professional Cloud Service Manager course.

Glanmire